Neso 1

$99.99
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  • https://player.vimeo.com/video/405211543?title=0&byline=0&portrait=0
  • Neso 1

Neso 1

$99.99
$99.99

Our original Neso beach tent.  Made out of a Lycra/Nylon blend.  UPF 50+ and water resistant.  Weighs only 4 lbs and fits in a carry-on suitcase.

What's included:

- Neso tent (82" x 80")

- Carrying bag (19.5").  Fits in a carry-on suitcase!

- 2 rust-proof aluminum poles (66" length)

- 4 anchor bags to fill with natural resources like sand or rocks

Advertise your business!  Contact us at info@neso.com if you are interested in a Neso Tent with custom branding.  (Minimum order quantity of 5 units applies.)

The Skin Cancer Foundation recommends
this product as an effective UV protectant.


UPF 50+ Protection

Blocks out 98% of the sun's UV rays

Lightweight

Easy to carry

Anchors

Versatile Anchoring Options

Water Resistant

For those rainy moments

Portable for Travel

Fits in a suitcase

Reinforced corners

Patented corners for added strength

Customer Reviews

Based on 9 reviews
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B
Bradley Cooper
Great Tent

This tent is great. Easy to set up & take down. Very durable in the rain & wind. Love it.

R
Ron
Makes a great boat shade!

Using the Neso 1 as a boat shade on our 23' center console. We don't use the Neso poles, but got the Green Elephant telescoping tarp poles to secure it in our cup/rod holders. Use the rope/sandbags to tie it to the center console tower. The material is nice and stretchy and also easy to store. We use the Neso sidelines 1 for our stern area though we use the bow shade much more frequently. We can keep it up when driving slow @ 6 miles/hour.

S
Seawatcher
Easy to tote and assemble - but only for 2 people.

I was hopeful that this would work, and it did. It was suuuper light and easy to assemble (here's a tip, dig holes for the sand bags and stretch the ties as far as they will go --face the tent into the wind). I purchased this light tent because we were staying in a condo and had a trek to the beach. My family members used the old, heavy tent with 4 posts. This was a nice addition to our tent area, but it is small. If you are in a camping chair, your head will touch the top of the tent, so we rigged a system with a covered chair. If you have low chairs, you will be fine. I may purchase the additional poles for extra height. In any case, this will provide sun coverage for two adults sitting very close together, but that's basically it. Easy? Yes! Sturdy? For the most part. Ample? No. I would consider the larger tent, but it may not be as stable. I saw other families with the larger size, and the tents seem to stay up.

r
rukshana cader
Forget the naysers...

I'll be honest, when I first bought this I had my doubts. I needed it for 10 days in Oahu in July. It is notoriously hot and breezy in Hawaii in July. I pitched the tent 6 times during the trip on all aspects of the island.

First, the necessary particulars.
Depending on wind conditions, the deeper you bury the sandbags and poles. Period. If there are any bad reviews based on construction, they simply did not bury deep enough.
1) BRING A SMALL SPADE OR SHOVEL!!! It's a must to dig deep. I simply used the shovel from my kid's beach toys.
2) Always, aim the front of the tent into the wind. Otherwise, your tent WILL blow over.
3) If in windy conditions, have a partner help you lay the material flat on the sand first. Put whatever you can on top to keep the material from blowing away.
4) Then begin filling the sandbags to maximum capacity. The heavier the better. Once all four bags are full, stretch them out to make the material taught. In doing so, this will give you a pretty good idea of where the bases of the poles should be dug.
5) The tennis balls on top of the poles should be about a foot from the corner of the front material. Now by my experience, if the wind is anywhere close to between 15-20 mph, then the poles need to be dug as deep as the first joint in each pole. The closer to the joint, the better, Any wind 15 mph or lower, the poles can be dug just halfway to the first joint. Once the poles are dug, insert them and slide them under the material with the tennis balls placed one foot from the front corners. Stretch out the sandbags to keep tautness on the pole to prevent it from blowing over, or have a partner hold the poles in place as you fill in the holes with as much sand as you can. Build up the sand around the poles too.
6) Once the poles are strongly in place, then begin digging holes for the sandbags as deep as you wish to go. In windy conditions, the deeper the better. Make sure the lines are taught, especially in windy conditions. Bottomline, if in wind, a partner is a must to erect it correctly. In low wind, I did it myself in minutes.

Below were my windiest experiences:
1) Lanikai Beach. This was the windiest day with intermittent gusts up to 25 mph with rain and black clouds. Weather in Hawaii never lasts long, but the Neso tent held its own. There were times I thought the poles were going to bend or snap, but nope, it held strong.
2) Kahala beach. Winds were 15-20 mph with occasional 25 mph gusts. The sand was not quite deep enough where I pitched so it required minor adjustments but never did the structure collapse.
3) Sunset beach. Winds 10-12 mph at sunset with occasional rain. It held strong as long as the above rules were followed.

So 5 stars all the way. It was bomb-proof and I received many compliments on the structure. For the money, this will last a long long time. For those "structural engineers" that claim this is shoddy, they must have gotten their degree from a crackerjack box, as this is not rocket science. THE WINDIER IT IS, THE DEEPER YOU MUST DIG.

Enjoy, and hope this helps.

K
Kristen
Great sunshade - follow their setup directions!

 I learned that it's very important to take time to properly set it up according exactly to the directions! On Day One it eventually gave way to strong winds and the poles fell down several times, and I was disappointed. On Day Two it was even windier (see video) but I followed the directions exactly: aimed it into the wind, stretched the fabric tight, filled the bags past overflowing, buried the bags in holes where I dug the sand from, and angled the poles into the wind. That baby held strong in buffeting winds without needing any further attention. I had people stopping by to ask which tent it was. The color is beautiful and the fabric is strong & stretchy and dries fast. It's easy to dismantle & pack up. The poles are lightweight and seem strong. I really like how open it feels sitting under the sunshade. We could definitely fit three people under if we were right next to each other. I really like this sunshade and would recommend it.